Homero Josh Garza, who founded the cryptocurrency startups GAW Miners and ZenMiner in 2014, acknowledged in a plea agreement that the companies were part of a pyramid scheme, and pleaded guilty to wire fraud in 2015. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission separately brought a civil enforcement action against Garza, who was eventually ordered to pay a judgment of $9.1 million plus $700,000 in interest. The SEC's complaint stated that Garza, through his companies, had fraudulently sold "investment contracts representing shares in the profits they claimed would be generated" from mining.[70]
Hello dear traders Those who follow Bitcoins and cryptocurrencies noticed that we are near a long-term trend line on a logarithmic graph and the probability that we will soon grow very high. There is a lot of evidence for this, and the first is the mood of the crowd, which has long been waiting for a trend reversal, and we have seen many altcoin flights over the...
Bitbuy.ca is a Canadian owned and operated digital currency platform. Originally founded as InstaBT in 2013, the company’s mission is to provide convenient, dependable and secure access to Bitcoin and other digital currencies. Customer service, ease of use, and quick turnaround times for deposits and withdrawals are pillars of this platform. They cater to beginners as well as experienced traders, and are one of Canada’s quickest growing buy/sell platforms. A great choice for users looking to buy and hold crypto, or users looking for a reliable on-ramp to turn their fiat into crypto quickly and easily.
Cryptocurrencies have been compared to Ponzi schemes, pyramid schemes[77] and economic bubbles,[78] such as housing market bubbles.[79] Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital Management stated in 2017 that digital currencies were "nothing but an unfounded fad (or perhaps even a pyramid scheme), based on a willingness to ascribe value to something that has little or none beyond what people will pay for it", and compared them to the tulip mania (1637), South Sea Bubble (1720), and dot-com bubble (1999).[80]

Ripple: Similarly to Bitcoin and Ethereum, Ripple is a decentralized payment system based on open-source. In fact, the project came years before its competitors, specifically in 2004 at the hands of Ryan Fugger. However, it was not until 2016 when he obtained the license to operate it. Unlike the previous ones, Ripple does not have mining operations nor will new currencies be created in the future. It is the third largest cryptocurrency in terms of market capitalization.


In 1998, Wei Dai published a description of "b-money", characterized as an anonymous, distributed electronic cash system.[12] Shortly thereafter, Nick Szabo described bit gold.[13] Like bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that would follow it, bit gold (not to be confused with the later gold-based exchange, BitGold) was described as an electronic currency system which required users to complete a proof of work function with solutions being cryptographically put together and published. A currency system based on a reusable proof of work was later created by Hal Finney who followed the work of Dai and Szabo.[citation needed]
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