Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin Forks: Bitcoin Cash is a spin-off of bitcoin, meant to have faster transactions, voted on and implemented by the Bitcoin community. Bitcoin Cash was probably the most successful Bitcoin fork in history, but there are always new forks popping up. Maybe Bitcoin Gold, Bitcoin Diamond, Bitcoin SV, or another will catch on.. although history says this is a rare occurrence. Keep your eye on the forks, but don’t expect them to be guaranteed the staying power of Bitcoin. Bitcoin forks are interesting altcoins, but it’s unlikely either will ever truly challenge Bitcoin for the top spot. The concept here is that Bitcoin is so relevant that it is important to keep an eye on its forks, especially the one that has really weathered the storm so far, Bitcoin Cash.
Below are coins that are no longer on our list of suggestions. They looked great in 2015, but they didn’t stand up over time. Consider we noted Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Dash in 2015, and we noted the coins below. If you invested in them at the time, you did very well. That said, being off the list doesn’t make these coins a bad bet; it just means they aren’t as attractive as they once were:

One of the newest digital currencies to make our list is EOS. Launched in June of 2018, EOS was created by cryptocurrency pioneer Dan Larimer. Before his work on EOS, Larimer founded the digital currency exchange Bitshares as well as the blockchain-based social media platform Steemit. Like other cryptocurrencies on this list, EOS is designed after ethereum, so it offers a platform on which developers can build decentralized applications. EOS is notable for many other reasons, though. First, its initial coin offering was one of the longest and most profitable in history, raking in a record $4 billion or so in investor funds through crowdsourcing efforts lasting a year. EOS offers a delegated proof-of-stake mechanism which it hopes to be able to offer scalability beyond its competitors. EOS consists of EOS.IO, similar to the operating system of a computer and acting as the blockchain network for the digital currency, as well as EOS coins. EOS is also revolutionary because of its lack of a mining mechanism to produce coins.

Decentralized cryptocurrency is produced by the entire cryptocurrency system collectively, at a rate which is defined when the system is created and which is publicly known. In centralized banking and economic systems such as the Federal Reserve System, corporate boards or governments control the supply of currency by printing units of fiat money or demanding additions to digital banking ledgers. In case of decentralized cryptocurrency, companies or governments cannot produce new units, and have not so far provided backing for other firms, banks or corporate entities which hold asset value measured in it. The underlying technical system upon which decentralized cryptocurrencies are based was created by the group or individual known as Satoshi Nakamoto.[23]


When a new crypto is launched, its founders announce how many coins will be mined. Once the quota is reached, no further coins can be produced. The first digital coin introduced was Bitcoin, which remains today the benchmark for all other digital coins. Among other currencies that have made their way into the cryptocurrency hall-of-fame we have: Ethereum, Ripple, Litecoin, EOS, and a number of derived currencies, including Bitcoin Cash and Bitcoin Gold.
TokenGazer: Storj V3 is promising but has difficulty in technical development and faces competition from other projects. TokenGazer released the Storj (STORJ) rating report: Storj overall rating: 3.5; indicator trend: outperform. Storj is trying to reduce redundancy and storage costs with a more complicated technical design, and adopts a more user-friendly pricing strategy. Storj V3, which is planned to launch in 2019, features multiple technical upgrades. Based on Storj's current network usage, TokenGazer believes that its capitalization is below the estimate value range, but it has difficulty in technical development and faces competition in the market.
Your section on Dash is a little sparse. Dash’s first new feature wasn’t instantSend but PrivateSend. Indeed Dash is the first and longest-running privacy coin. Might wanna add that. Also, Dash invented the masternodes system, which allows instantSend and privateSend to work. This also lets the project have a decentralized governance structure, and a censorship-free way of funding projects. Currently, the Dash ecosystem gets roughly $1 million per month to spend on everything from Developers to expansion projects in Venezuela. I would love to see these brief updates made to your Dash section.
CoinMama is a veteran broker platform that anyone can visit to buy bitcoin or Ether using your credit card or cash via MoneyGram. CoinMama is great for those who want to make instant straightforward purchases of digital currency using their local currency. Although the CoinMama service is available worldwide, users should be aware that some countries may not be able to use all the functions of the site. CoinMama is available in English, German, French, Italian and Russian. Check out the CoinMama FAQ
Nxt: Not only does this nifty coin sport a name similar to Steve Job’s other company; it uses a cool and different algorithm for producing coins. This algorithm – an implementation of a proof-of-stake scheme rather than proof-of-work – may be less burdensome on the environment and has long-term potential. It may be worth a tad less than the other coins we recommend; it is worth about a penny on the dollar on a good day. However, less cost per coin means you have less to lose if the coin value deflates. Nxt is like Namecoin. It had a super cool code but didn’t though perform at the same level as other cryptos (until late 2017 where it saw a notable price hike). It is still priced very low in USD.
As of May 2018, over 1,800 cryptocurrency specifications existed.[24] Within a cryptocurrency system, the safety, integrity and balance of ledgers is maintained by a community of mutually distrustful parties referred to as miners: who use their computers to help validate and timestamp transactions, adding them to the ledger in accordance with a particular timestamping scheme.[14]
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