Howdy, Welcome to popular Cryptocurrency blog 'CoinSutra'. I'm Harsh Agrawal, a tech enthusiast & Digital nomad from New Delhi, India.I started CoinSutra to help users around the globe to learn about popular Cryptocurrencies.Here at CoinSutra I write about Bitcoin Wallet, Cryptocurrency wallets, Online Privacy & Security, VPN experiences & making money from Crypto.
Cryptocurrencies hold the promise of making it easier to transfer funds directly between two parties in a transaction, without the need for a trusted third party such as a bank or credit card company; these transfers are facilitated through the use of public keys and private keys for security purposes. In modern cryptocurrency systems, a user's "wallet," or account address, has the public key, and the private key is used to sign transactions. Fund transfers are done with minimal processing fees, allowing users to avoid the steep fees charged by most banks and financial institutions for wire transfers.
The e-coin that is considered Ethereum’s biggest competitor. The EOS blockchain gained its fame because of the way it effectively records and secures transactions. It is similar to the Ethereum blockchain but faster, more scalable, and allows users to build decentralized applications more efficiently. Market analysts are promoting the currency as ‘The Most Powerful Infrastructure for Decentralized Applications’ and expect the coin to be dumped and pumped, which could provide some interesting short-term opportunities.

"There is a very high degree of risk involved in trading securities. With respect to margin-based foreign exchange trading, off-exchange derivatives, and cryptocurrencies, there is considerable exposure to risk, including but not limited to, leverage, creditworthiness, limited regulatory protection and market volatility that may substantially affect the price, or liquidity of a currency or related instrument. It should not be assumed that the methods, techniques, or indicators presented in these products will be profitable, or that they will not result in losses." Learn more.
Digital currency puts the power back in the hands of the user and breaks free of centralized and governing agencies. You own the private and public keys that make up your address - and nobody can take them away from you. Selecting the right option, however, depends on how you will use it. For some, you need to crowdsource or create contracts, and for others, it’s purely transactional. By understanding the benefits of each option and matching the right ones to your needs, you can make a more informed choice. We hope this list of cryptocurrencies has been informative, make sure to check out our other blog posts for more info on how cryptocurrency works!
BTCP is the ticker for Bitcoin private. I’m not going to speculate on prices, but I will say that your information seems not great. If a Bitcoin fork is going to do well it’ll probably be one of the more popular ones. Maybe Bitcoin Gold or Bitcoin private. $1k Bitcoin Pro seems random, I can’t even confirm that Bitcoin Pro is a thing. Do you have any links?
In May 2018, Bitcoin Gold (and two other cryptocurrencies) were hit by a successful 51% hashing attack by an unknown actor, in which exchanges lost estimated $18m.[72] In June 2018, Korean exchange Coinrail was hacked, losing US$37 million worth of altcoin. Fear surrounding the hack was blamed for a $42 billion cryptocurrency market selloff.[73] On 9 July 2018 the exchange Bancor had $23.5 million in cryptocurrency stolen.[74]

The validity of each cryptocurrency's coins is provided by a blockchain. A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.[23][26] Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block,[26] a timestamp and transaction data.[27] By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. It is "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way".[28] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority.
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