Cryptocurrency list provides you with a real-time list of cryptocurrencies by market cap. As cryptocurrencies with Bitcoin as the current flagship are becoming more mainstream, more and more people are looking for information to understand what are the different cryptocurrencies they should invest in. Cryptocurrencylist.io was built to serve everybody who wants to know more about cryptocurrencies.
Bitcoin and popular altcoins can be found on TradingView, through the free, real-time data of 25 exchanges. Cryptocurrencies are somewhat similar to precious metals, in that their creation is controlled and most have a cap on the amount of units, just like precious metals, which have limited minable amounts. One of our most popular chats is the Cryptocurrencies chat where traders talk in real-time about where the Cryptocurrency market is going.
Zcash, a decentralized and open-source cryptocurrency launched in the latter part of 2016, looks promising. “If bitcoin is like http for money, zcash is https," is one analogy zcash uses to define itself. Zcash offers privacy and selective transparency of transactions. Thus, like https, zcash claims to provide extra security or privacy where all transactions are recorded and published on a blockchain, but details such as the sender, recipient, and amount remain private. Zcash offers its users the choice of “shielded” transactions, which allow for content to be encrypted using advanced cryptographic technique or zero-knowledge proof construction called a zk-SNARK developed by its team. As of February 9, 2019, Zcash had a market cap of $291.25 million and a value per token of $49.84.
Central to the appeal and function of Bitcoin is the blockchain technology it uses to store an online ledger of all the transactions that have ever been conducted using bitcoins, providing a data structure for this ledger that is exposed to a limited threat from hackers and can be copied across all computers running Bitcoin software. Every new block generated must be verified by the ledgers of each user on the market, making it almost impossible to forge transaction histories. Many experts see this blockchain as having important uses in technologies such as online voting and crowdfunding, and major financial institutions such as JPMorgan Chase see potential in cryptocurrencies to lower transaction costs by making payment processing more efficient. However, because cryptocurrencies are virtual and do not have a central repository, a digital cryptocurrency balance can be wiped out by a computer crash if a backup copy of the holdings does not exist, or if somebody simply loses their private keys.
Ripple: Similarly to Bitcoin and Ethereum, Ripple is a decentralized payment system based on open-source. In fact, the project came years before its competitors, specifically in 2004 at the hands of Ryan Fugger. However, it was not until 2016 when he obtained the license to operate it. Unlike the previous ones, Ripple does not have mining operations nor will new currencies be created in the future. It is the third largest cryptocurrency in terms of market capitalization.
2) Pseudonymous: Neither transactions nor accounts are connected to real-world identities. You receive Bitcoins on so-called addresses, which are randomly seeming chains of around 30 characters. While it is usually possible to analyze the transaction flow, it is not necessarily possible to connect the real world identity of users with those addresses.
“If the trend continues, the average person will not be able to afford to purchase one whole bitcoin in 2 years. As global economies inflate and markets exhibit signs of recession, the world will turn to Bitcoin as a hedge against fiat turmoil and an escape against capital controls. Bitcoin is the way out, and cryptocurrency as a whole is never going away, it’s going to grow in use and acceptance as it matures.”
NOTES: We created this site in 2015, here three years later (in 2018) the market has evolved and changed a considerable amount. Thus, presenting a list of cryptocurrencies went from being a reasonable thing to do to an impossible task for a site that doesn’t make listing cryptocurrencies its main focus. For a list of most of the current cryptocurrencies, you can check out CoinMarketCap.com. Our brief list below will focus only on some top coins that have made it through the years or that are still relevant today and will note some up-and-coming coins.
Der Punkt ist aber, dass es mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit nicht so weitergehen wird wie bisher. Als Journalisten, die für die Presse-Flaggschiffe des westliche Finanzsystems arbeiten, berufen sie sich gerne auf „Experten“, die eine weitere Krise für unvermeidlich halten. Das weiß aber im Grunde jeder, der seine Augen offen hält. Ein Crash könnte der Durchbruch für den Bitcoin, zumindest aber für die Technologie dahinter werden. Satoshi Nakamoto schickte sein mittlerweile berühmtes White Paper zum Bitcoin am 31.10.2008 in die Welt, im April 2011 kam seine letzte Email und seitdem schweigt er und niemand weiß, wer er ist. Es gibt klare Hinweise darauf, dass sein Bitcoin-Entwurf eine direkte Reaktion auf die Finanzkrise 2008 war. Einmal ist ihm ein Geniestreich gelungen, vielleicht gelingt ihm ein zweiter, wenn er in der nächsten Krise seine eigene Million Bitcoins (von den insgesamt 14,16 Mio. Bitcoins - Stand Mai 2015) klug einsetzt.
EOS is also the first blockchain with a constitution. There are governing principles that every stakeholder agrees on, and the set of rules is attached to every block that is mined. EOS will have the capability to process millions of transactions each second using horizontal scaling. This is much different from Bitcoin and Ethereum. The current model also allows for 5 percent inflation, which can be used to further develop the network. In addition, EOS does not require users to pay for each transaction, which will help fuel adoption.
In 2013, Jean-Loup Richet, a research fellow at ESSEC ISIS, surveyed new money laundering techniques that cybercriminals were using in a report written for the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.[12] A common approach to cyber money laundering was to use a digital currency exchanger service which converted dollars into Liberty Reserve and could be sent and received anonymously. The receiver could convert the Liberty Reserve currency back into cash for a small fee. In May 2013, digital currency exchanger Liberty Reserve was shut down after the alleged founder, Arthur Budovsky Belanchuk, and four others were arrested in Costa Rica, Spain, and New York "under charges for conspiracy to commit money laundering and conspiracy and operation of an unlicensed money transmitting business."[13] Budovsky, a former U.S. citizen and naturalized Costa Rican, was convicted in connection with the 2006 Gold Age raid.[9][14] A U.S. indictment said the case "is believed to be the largest international money laundering prosecution in history."[14] More than $40 million in assets were placed under restraint pending forfeiture, and more than 30 Liberty Reserve exchanger domain names were seized.[13][15] The company was estimated to have laundered $6 billion in criminal proceeds.[13]
On 21 November 2017, the Tether cryptocurrency announced they were hacked, losing $31 million in USDT from their primary wallet.[71] The company has 'tagged' the stolen currency, hoping to 'lock' them in the hacker's wallet (making them unspendable). Tether indicates that it is building a new core for its primary wallet in response to the attack in order to prevent the stolen coins from being used.
NOTES: We created this site in 2015, here three years later (in 2018) the market has evolved and changed a considerable amount. Thus, presenting a list of cryptocurrencies went from being a reasonable thing to do to an impossible task for a site that doesn’t make listing cryptocurrencies its main focus. For a list of most of the current cryptocurrencies, you can check out CoinMarketCap.com. Our brief list below will focus only on some top coins that have made it through the years or that are still relevant today and will note some up-and-coming coins.

In 1998, Wei Dai published a description of "b-money", characterized as an anonymous, distributed electronic cash system.[12] Shortly thereafter, Nick Szabo described bit gold.[13] Like bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that would follow it, bit gold (not to be confused with the later gold-based exchange, BitGold) was described as an electronic currency system which required users to complete a proof of work function with solutions being cryptographically put together and published. A currency system based on a reusable proof of work was later created by Hal Finney who followed the work of Dai and Szabo.[citation needed]
×