A cryptocurrency exchange or a digital currency exchange (DCE) is a business that allows customers to trade cryptocurrencies or digital currencies for other assets, such as conventional fiat money or other digital currencies. A cryptocurrency exchange can be a market maker that typically takes the bid-ask spreads as a transaction commission for is service or, as a matching platform, simply charges fees.
Dogecoin is a peer-to-peer electronic payment system based on the popular 2013 meme of the Shiba Inu dog.  It was a fork of Luckycoin, which was itself a fork of Litecoin. The coin uses a PoW script mining algorithm similar to Bitcoin; however, while Bitcoin has a limited number of coins, there is no limit to the number of Dogecoins which can be created. The current rate of Dogecoin creation is over 5,000,000,000 coins a year.
Thank you for this guide. Hopefully there are no stupid questions here – but a quick clarification would be helpful. This and some of your other guides make reference to “requesting a transaction” at the very beginning of the process. What does that mean? Is is simply the request to purchase bitcoin in exchange for USD or whatever medium of exchange? Thank you in advance!

Bitcoin: This digital system based on the blockchain was conceived in 2009 by Satoshi Nakamoto, with its identity unknown to this day. Currently occupies the first position in the ranking of market capitalization and has various forks, representing the variation of existing cryptocurrency, but acting as an independent entity, emerged since 2017. Forks such as Bitcoin Gold, Bitcoin Cash, with the total number of forks currently exceeding ten. Unlike other cryptocurrencies such as Ripple or Ethereum, the production of Bitcoin will continue to reach 21 million Bitcoin.

Most cryptocurrencies are designed to gradually decrease production of that currency, placing a cap on the total amount of that currency that will ever be in circulation.[25] Compared with ordinary currencies held by financial institutions or kept as cash on hand, cryptocurrencies can be more difficult for seizure by law enforcement.[1] This difficulty is derived from leveraging cryptographic technologies.
In February 2014 the world's largest bitcoin exchange, Mt. Gox, declared bankruptcy. The company stated that it had lost nearly $473 million of their customers' bitcoins likely due to theft. This was equivalent to approximately 750,000 bitcoins, or about 7% of all the bitcoins in existence. The price of a bitcoin fell from a high of about $1,160 in December to under $400 in February.[67]
In 1983, the American cryptographer David Chaum conceived an anonymous cryptographic electronic money called ecash.[7][8] Later, in 1995, he implemented it through Digicash,[9] an early form of cryptographic electronic payments which required user software in order to withdraw notes from a bank and designate specific encrypted keys before it can be sent to a recipient. This allowed the digital currency to be untraceable by the issuing bank, the government, or any third party.
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